Lest We Forget: Remembrances of World War I
Scottish Fisheries Museum

An exhibition highlighting the stories of some of those commemorated on our local war memorials, how their lives were touched by war and how our communities remember them.

Admission:

Included in museum admission:
adult: £9, concession: £7
accompanied children : FREE
Group rates available - please contact 01333 310628 or enquiries@scotfishmuseum.org

Highlights

Armistice Day on 11 November 1918 marked the end of the fighting in the “war to end all wars”. The following year, a Service of Remembrance was held in London at a temporary cenotaph to honour the fallen. 100 years later, this annual event is more widely observed than ever: but how should we commemorate events that are slipping from memory?
Like most Scottish communities, Anstruther and Cellardyke were deeply affected by the War. The local War Memorials list the names of those who served: on board ships in the Irish Sea or Adriatic, in the trenches or behind the lines in northern France or Gallipoli, and in the fledgling air-force. No family was unaffected and the need to mark this momentous experience and its impact was heartfelt and immediate.
The Scottish Fisheries Museum, in partnership with the Anstruther and Kilrenny Burgh Collection and with funding from the Royal Burgh of Anstruther Common Good Fund and McCarthy and Stone, has brought together numerous items that show the role ordinary people played in this extraordinary event.
One of those featured is Private Alex Doig of the Black Watch (Royal Highlanders). There are many stories of lucky Bibles stopping bullets or shrapnel fragments and saving a soldier’s life during the First World War. Unfortunately, his pocket Bible was unable to save the life of Alex who was killed by a shell burst on 9th February 1918. The Bible still bears the scars.
Lest We Forget: Remembrances of World War I highlights the individual stories of local people who served in various theatres of war to show how Anstruther and Cellardyke contributed to, and were affected by, the war effort.
Personal narratives, intertwined with public efforts, illustrate one community’s attempt to grieve, to comprehend and to endure, and ask us to consider how we should remember in future.

Location