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Descendants invited to Battle of Amiens centenary commemoration

Posted  23 March 2018 in News  
By Liz Robertson
MINISTRY OF INFORMATION FIRST WORLD WAR OFFICIAL COLLECTION (Q 8289) The 380 mm gun of Chuignolles, captured by the 3rd Australian Battalion, 23 August 1918. The largest gun captured in the War (calibre 15 in, length 70 feet, range 24 miles). Used from July 1918 - August 9th for the bombardment of Amiens, when disabled by its gun crew. It was presented by its captors to the city of Amiens. Stereoscopic. Copyright: © IWM. Original Source: http://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205244168 MINISTRY OF INFORMATION FIRST WORLD WAR OFFICIAL COLLECTION (Q 8289) The 380 mm gun of Chuignolles, captured by the 3rd Australian Battalion, 23 August 1918. The largest gun captured in the War (calibre 15 in, length 70 feet, range 24 miles). Used from July 1918 - August 9th for the bombardment of Amiens, when disabled by its gun crew. It was presented by its captors to the city of Amiens. Stereoscopic. Copyright: © IWM. Original Source: http://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205244168

Descendants of those who fought at the Battle of Amiens are invited to apply for tickets to commemorate the centenary of the battle that saw one of the greatest advances of the First World War.

600 tickets are available for descendants to attend an event on 8 August at Amiens Cathedral, France. The event, held in partnership with the Australian, Canadian, French and U.S. governments, will tell the story of the Battle of Amiens which heralded the Hundred Days Offensive and the path to the Armistice in November 1918.

Described by German General, Erich Ludendorff as the black day of the German Army, Amiens started 8 August 1918 and lasted three days. It marked the beginning of the Hundred Days offensive that eventually won the war. The Allied forces, made up of British, Australian, Canadian, French and U.S. soldiers, advanced over seven miles on the first day of the battle, one of the greatest advances of the war.

Less known than the Battle of Passchendaele or the Battle of the Somme, Amiens marked a distinct change compared to the huge loss of life and devastation of previous battles. This is reflected in the stories of Allied troops who were there, which can be found on Lives of the First World War.

Those with an emotional connection to the Battle of Amiens or the war on the Western Front during the summer of 1918 can:
Apply for tickets to attend the ceremony inside Amiens Cathedral on 8 August
● Research and remember their ancestors who fought in the First World War on Imperial War Museums’ Lives of the First World War

www.gov.uk/guidance/amiens100

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